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. we saw that before with newt gingrich and bill clinton. and in clinton's second term, they did actually get stuff done. they worked it out between them. but does the president have that kind of relationship with john boehner, say, where we can feel optimistic that they're going to have a very different kind of relationship but can actually be more effective? >> i think there's a different kind of dynamic that speaker boehner has to deal with. i don't know him personally, but his reputation is that he can get deals done, but then he has to sell them in a caucus, some whom, a minority, but a vocal minority of whom are very rigid indeed. so i think the speaker has an opportunity to show his more magnanimous leadership and to lead the whole of the house, and not just his caucus. and as he does that, i think his relationship, not just with the president, but with the general public will improve, and i hope it does. >> one of the issues he's going to face is gun crime, gun control, gun violence, generally. he's been generally audacious in terms of the proposals he's put forward. ther
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president bill clinton gave the film its most ringing endorsement yet saying that is shows how all of the great decisions in american history were forged in, quote, a cauldron of principle and compromise. now, that's a lovely phrase, of course, but is it true? let's bring in thomas frank of harper's magazine. good afternoon, tom. >> hey, martin. >> thank you for looking in my direction. now, tom, what is wrong with you because everyone from david brooks to bill clinton is in love with this film, but you say in your latest column, "lincoln" is a move ni that makes viewers feel noble at first but on reflection the sentiment feels hollow. it's not only a hackneyed film but a mendacious one as well. what is wrong with you? >> i don't know, martin. it's something -- it's congenital or something. i'm always like this. i'm always going the wrong direction, but it doesn't surprise me that bill clinton is going to celebrate something like this. i mean, come on. this is a man that invented triangulation. and you think of all the great triumphs of triangulation, of bipartisanship in the clint
pushed a gun ban through in 1994 and bill clinton's justice department said it had no contact impact on crime. let's look at violent culture. things that can address the underlying problem. retailers across the country have seen a surge in sales lately as many are stocking up on weapons they apparently come by once the federal government takes steps steps to reduce violence. >> gun sales have gone through the roof. everything -- anything and everything. rifles, handguns i think people on the fence about buying had plan to buy one were pushed a little harder now because they're afraid that they're not going to be able to buy certain weapons. >> vice president boyden said this week he thinks a great deal can be done without imbringing on the rights guaranteed by the second amendment. harris? >> peter, thank you. president obama may have an idea of whom he would like to replace lisa jackson. remember her? she ran the environmental protection agency until a recent scandal. now the probe into what was happening while jackson was on the job may be a road block for the president. we'll tell
tyson did not like some of bill clinton's policies when he was governor the first time around because he was making some reforms around trucking, the trucking industry. and, of course, if you're a big poultry player, you're trucking a lot of chickens. and so bill clinton got punished. he didn't get elected to be governor when he ran again x then he reformed -- and then he reformed as far as tyson was concerned. so he has had the support of tyson ever since then. so when the clinton administration came into office, they facilitated the first stage of privatizing meat inspection which we have been living with ever since and which now the obama administration is trying to take a step further. the clinton administration privatized it in the processing, you know, meat -- animals are slaughtered, and then they're sent to another step where they're cut up and processed and packaged. so in the processing there's been this privatized system that we've done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is at food and water watch. now the obama administration wants to increase this program especially for
's wonderful. >> the problem is there's no ronald reagan, there's no bill clinton, there's nobody to talk. you know, the average person thinks that we suddenly had a revenue shortfall and that's why we're running a deficit. they have no idea that we've got tons of revenue but that spending is at a ridiculous level now. 25% of gdp. it needs to get down to 17% of gdp. nobody has explained this to the public properly or convincingly. >> aunder your favorite presidet the debt has gone from roughly 10 trillion to 16 trillion. we just had the treasury numbers out yesterday. in fact, in the last year it went up again 1.3 trillion. now, this leaves an opening for the republicans. but i don't think they're smart enough to take it. and i agree with costa. actually, the president, who is a very clever political guy, they're letting him get off because he doesn't want to cut 13e7bding. mark is right. except smash the defense department. the rest of it, the entitlements, the discretionary, the little entitlements, he doesn't want to touch them. >> i don't know. was there a question in there? >> i think som
's go back a few administrations for context. bill clinton started his second term, enjoyed the highest recent number of people who felt the country was in good shape on inauguration day. >> all right. let's get to gloria borger. i was writing down those numbers. john avlon and david gergen are also here. that's an interesting set of numbers. i would look at 49 in terms of approval, things like that, six, eight months ago as a big improvement. >> it is. and his personal likability is still over 61%. but what i'm looking at is the country's expectations. when president obama was first inaugurated, he became -- and a lot of his staffers will tell you this -- sort of a victim of the high expectations that the public had for him. now the expectations are kind of lower, so the folks in the administration are saying, well, if the expectations are lower, maybe we can overperform a little instead of underperforming like people thought we did last time around. so they're kind of looking for the glass half full part of this. equation. >> one of the things going on beneath numbers indicates a sort
the clinton administration after the u.s. joined the wpa, but the very controversial farm bill passed. that is the legislation to completely get away with the remaining new deal protections. it deregulated what was our to begun in the 1950s, except all government intervention had eliminated all of the final vestiges of the programs like the grain reserve in the most immediate result after that bill passed, you might remember it, it was called freedom to farm. farmers quickly started calling it their bill. it was the dramatic increase in the production of commodities. because all of the programs that have kept them out of production were now being planned and so by 1999, the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. i'm sorry, 50% below 1996 levels. and corn was down 41%. farmers were in economic distress. it was all sorts of pressure on congress to do something. food industry lobbying meant that the policymakers reinstated some supply management and instead congress used taxpayer money to keep farmers afloat so they wouldn't be putting pressure in rural areas on the members of congress
: bill clinton got a ten-year assault weapons ban by two votes, but this is a much more conservative congress. a recent poll shows a slim majority of americans oppose such a ban, and the nra is ready for battle. >> the likelihood is that they are not going to be able to getan assault weapons ban through this congress. >> reporter: even a democratic senator says it won't happen. >> assault weapons stand -- >> on just guns alone will not in the political reality that we have will not go anywhere. >> reporter: but other provisions may have a chance according to experts. why do hunters need a clip that carries more than ten rounds, and why shouldn't gun buyers at gun shows be required to have their background checked? >> congress surely can and should act to close that loophole and to make more uniform the background check process across all the 50 states. >> reporter: rather than pass laws, one lawmaker is appealing directly to retailers. >> when a mainstream store like walmart says we're not going to do it, it will make people think twice. >> reporter: schumer is hoping these big box s
>> greta: 11:00 is almost here, it's time for last call. former president bill clinton joking about his wife, secretary of state hillary clinton. take a look at why he calls himself hillary's first husband. >> very, very healthy. and very low blood pressure and low standing heartbeat. i tell you she's got time to have three more husbands after me. so i think she'll live to be 120. i always know that she's thinking about that whenever i am stubborn about something and my quest at self improvement. she refers to me as her first husband. >> greta: that is your last call. thank you for being with us tonight. we'll see you again tomorrow night. make sure you go to gretawire.com. tell us what you thought about tonight's show. there is lots to talk about. good night from washington. to? tonight at 8:00. >> eric: hello, i'm eric bolling with andrea tantaros, bob beckel,be dana perino and gregreg gutfeld is back! it's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> eric: as expected, president become become used kids as backdrop addressing the american people on the plans for a new gun
actor. and it was actually introduced by none other than former president bill clinton, who just kind of a weird time in our movie culture right now. >> well, the golden globes are done by the hollywood foreign press, and they love movies about international politics. now, maybe "lincoln" was too american for them. the only award they gave was to the british actor who played abe lincoln. even movies like "salmon fishing in the yemen," which i actually saw, had to do with foreign politics. "les mis"had to do with french politics. bill clinton was a big get, even bigger than jennifer lopez. they didn't want to spring for obama, but they got a pretty good guy. he requires a lot of perks in the dressing room, i can only imagine. >> michael. >> he's a total professional. he was barely looking at the prompter. he knew his lines. he was much better than the inebriated people, like the guy pretending to be high and said lisa dunham instead of lena dunham. >> the worst was salma hayek, her prompter went down. she and the actor with her, paul rudd, they totally forgot what they were going to do
negotiation. things can change, right? in 200 woon, when bill clinton left office, at this point, we would have had no net debt. what changed that? the republicans chasmed that. they created the structural deficit -- >> neil: wait a minute. we can go back in time and talk about 9/11 and a recession was taking hold. i don't want to go back in history. i want to ask thufinaly, would you agree that if we get a republican president and he or she is demanding the same prerogative you want to give this president right now, you, simon, would be on board and say go for it. >> i think we should eliminate the vote over the debt ceiling, both party, both presidents for all time -- >> neil: you would give a republican the same eye am going to save this tape. when it comes to that, i am going to have you back. >> hopefully, that won't be for a long time. >> neil: i thought you would say that, touche. >> okay. >> neil: from help out of d.c. to big doings in d.c., the city is getting readyr spiffy for a piece of history. the president's inauguration on monday. since january 20 falls on a sunday, the pres
turn and below bill clinton, and 51%. and he said i'm going to close gitmo, that did not work out his way and almost everybody said it would be impossible to close because we've got a problem, we have nowhere to put those people. >> he said he'd close it in the first year. >> the first thing he signed. >> absolutely. the left plank after he didn't do it the first year, he'll do it the second year and the third year and the fourth year. >> harder when he's a candidate to an achieve. the economy, they said if they passed the massive unemployment, it'd keep under 8%, it was spiked up to 10% and down to 7.8 and they say it's a fail. and killed osama bin laden, and passed health care, what kind of program we'll be we're only getting it now, it passed two years ago. >> alisyn: and iraq, promised to end iraq and making steps towards that as well. >> iraq and afghanistan. >> although unemployment continues to be a problem. i read this morning one more person unemployed, manti te'o's imagery girlfriend has lost her job. >> her imagery job. >> she didn't show up. >> we found out she was alive b
with bill clinton and the republican congress, look at 2011. i think in the end they will decide they cannot use this measure and they seem to be heading that way this week in their house republican retreat. >> ian bremer is with us. he's the president of your asia group. business leaders around the world pay attention to you. i was intrigued to see you wrote the continuing role of u.s. stability tops your list of upside in your global economic outlook. u.s. stability you said, not instability. thought it was a typo. you've been lying under a rock for the last several weeks or i'd like to try a dose of whatever medication you're on. >> not as if i think washington is working well. the washington dysfunction was number four of the top risk we put out in 2013. the question is what's the impact on the united states as opposed to a china, russia, brazil. the u.s. is the world's largest economy, the u.s. dollar is a global reserve currency. housing continues to pick up, unemployment is going down, american corporations are the world's largest and they're sitting on lots of cash, which, you know,
former president bill clinton showed up to introduce best picture nominee "lincoln." he was greeted with a standing ovation. among the other winners best comedy or musical with "les miserables," best actor in a drama daniel day-lewis for "lincoln." he was incredible. actress in a drama jessica chastain for "zero dark thirty." actor in a comedy or musical hugh jackman for "les mis." jennifer lawrence for silver linings playbook. haven't seen that. a lot of nominees. jodie foster was honored with a cecil b. demille last night. the 50-year-old actress surprised some by talking about her sexual orientation. during that speech she said she "came out" to friends and family "1,000 years ago." >> that was the first time she was open about it. ben affleck, he got a standing ovation because a lot of people say he got snubbed for the oscar nominations. so there you go. he validated last night. >> i guess he forgot to thank george clooney. but his wife did. i was up all night watching it. >>> the next half hour, a sibling reunion 60 years in the making. h
court by bill clinton, and in 2009, selected for the supreme court by president obama. your first day working here-- terrifying? >> sotomayor: overwhelmingly terrifying. i was so nervous that day that my knees knocked, and i thought everybody in the court room could hear them knocking. >> pelley: well, come on. you'd been a federal judge for more than 15 years at that point. >> sotomayor: i had not been a supreme court justice. it's a very different stage. >> pelley: on this stage, she's one of the most vocal questioners. and her vote most often falls on the liberal side. she helped uphold the health care act and strike down tough illegal immigration statues. back in the bronx, as a girl, she set her heart on being a cop, inspired by nancy drew novels and tv. but by the age of eight, the plot of her life was rewritten by diabetes. the doctors told you because of your type 1 diabetes... >> sotomayor: type 1 diabetes. at any rate... >> pelley: ...you couldn't be a cop. >> sotomayor: yes, i couldn't be a cop. i figured out very quickly, watching perry mason, that i could do some of the s
about second term curses that have brought down richard nixon, hampered ronald reagan, bill clinton. people forget reagan was able to get tax reform, bill clinton was able to get a balanced budget. certainly a big opportunity for the president but fully aware in the white house, a lot of challenges ahead as well, jenna. >> certainly not challenges for a father. nice to see the first family, ed, and how much the girls have grown up over the last four years. what we're looking at for the president tomorrow besides the hair styles and what everybody is wearing at the inauguration is what is he going to say? what will be the address to the nation tomorrow? you mentioned some policy challenges ahead. what are you hearing about tomorrow's address and how that might set the table, if you will, for the years to come? >> true. what i'm hearing is the state of the union address next month is really where the president will go with a deeper dive on policy, whether it be gun control, immigration reform, the debt ceiling debate. tomorrow's broad scene. his senior advisor will talk about bringing
of the clinton bill, he stood up and said -- he told the story of the valentine's day massacre in 1929. and how it shocked the world when seven gangsters were gunned down in cold blood. it made the fog page -- the front page of every major paper in the nation and around the world. but in 1992, when a woman say to three month-old baby from execution by hiding that baby under the bed -- she was shot and killed along with her husband and teenage son. that story turned up on the second section buried in the back of the new york times. it was not front page news. it was barely news at all. i'll never forget what he said. he said, "i called that defining deviancy down." it wasn't even news. had it happened in 1929, it would've been astonishing. we can no longer to continue to define it deviancy down. we cannot wait any longer to take action. the time has come. as you know i delivered a set of recommendations to president obama on how we can better protect americans from gun violence i have been getting both credit and blame from that. i want to make it clear. the only power the vice president has is
, and pat caddell, former pollster for president jimmy carter, and doug schoen, form pollster for bill clinton. john kerry has a lock. he is a member the boys' club. the others? >> there will be issues and challenges with all three. if i had to bet i bet they all are confirmed and that hagel will be the toughest but ultimately will get through. the larger issue, with brennan going to c.i.a. and with jack lew going to treasury this is the effective consolidation of the white house and the president directly over treasury and c.i.a. and c.i.a. nominally an independent agency. >>gregg: these are corner -- cronies? >> yes and it is worrisome. >>gregg: pat, especially hagel who has said to republicans, troubling things about iran, hamas, hezbollah. >> said troubling things to democrats and not just republicans and he will be the most problematic. we see president obama and his chief of staff will either be biden's or the deputy of tom donnalyn, all white males, to drop the mask of pretense of bipartisanship, pushing the agenda through and the discussion each of them is what we can do in ter
. the welfare reform program work. the greatest decrease in child poverty in america came under bill clinton with a republican congress in the late 1990's. that is just a fact. jeffrey is shaking his head. no, it is a fact. the lowest level of black children in poverty in history was 1997. you could make an argument that having a welfare system shift toward opportunity would work. >> i'm going to give you all the time you need. before that, what would you say then to those who read the "new york times" stories when they did to review 15 years after bill clinton's welfare to work program, that women and children were falling faster into poverty than anybody else? [applause] i too was the program that helped push them in there? were they wrong? -- it was that program that helped push them in there? were they wrong? >> yes, but let me carry you two steps further. i have been working with a former california assembly leader on a project state-by- state to get people out of prison if they are there for non-violent crimes, to get them brought back into society. you cannot discuss how we will solve
concentration. when i was a point person for president clinton and passing the brady bill and the late part of november 93 and the assault weapons ban in the house in the spring of 94, it was those to those very focused on criminal acts nice. president clinton's legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized to have a conversation internally and have a serious conversation, but for the assault weapons ban, were done with columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe in the last four years, the last eight years of politics, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion and appropriate politics to be focused for the president to introduce this legislation or package undecided what is going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point is postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. my small plaintiff caution anything but the last time i had success, goes back in 93 and 94. those were pretty columbine. his entire package fell flat. >> co
under bill clinton with a republican congress in the late 1990's. that is just a fact. jeffrey is shaking his head. no, it is a fact. the lowest level of black children in poverty in history was 1997. you could make an argument that having a welfare system shift toward opportunity would work. >> i'm going to give you all the time you need. before that, what would you say then to those who read the "new york times" stories when they did to review 15 years after bill clinton's welfare to work program, that women and children were falling faster into poverty than anybody else? [applause] it was that program that helped push them in there? were they wrong? >> yes, but let me carry you two steps further. i have been working with a former california assembly leader on a project state-by- state to get people out of prison if they are there for non-violent crimes, to get them brought back into society. you cannot discuss how we will solve some of these problems without rethinking prison in america. [applause] ok? now that is a very difficult challenge for both parties. one last example
lewis. also nominated, bill clinton. >> what an exciting special guest. that was hillary clinton's husband. >> reporter: and the best dressed nominations, clooney, clooney, clooney. and the winner is clooney. most beautiful, tina fey. these are my awards, i decide. and best acceptance speech by a new mom that doesn't get out much these days, adele. >> oh, my god! oh, my god! >> reporter: nick watt, abc news, los angeles. >> that was one of the better, funnier shows in recent years. amy and tina fey, for me, permanent gig i think. let these two have a crack at it. >> that was amazing. >> very good stuff. congrats to all the winners and the host last night. more from abc news coming up next. where is our golden globes? >> i know. the host last night. more from abc news coming up next. ÑsÑsñ >>> this morning on "world news now," back pedaling. lance armstrong finally admits to doping to win the tour de france. >> and abc news has learned armstrong is now talking about naming names of others involved with performance enhancing drugs. it's tuesday, january 15. >> from abc news, th
of the 99's under the bill clinton administration. they did it with spending cuts and revenue increases. we had ahe 1990's, combination of things that led to a balanced budget. i think being responsible with our revenue and how we spend it is something all of america is focused on. look what happens when the government is responsible with its revenue. you have the business community living at the government acting responsible with the money. what happens? it means that confidence develops. confidence is such a key ingredient of economic recovery. the stock market went through the roof during the recovery. people got wealthy because of the rise of the stock market. the stock market rose because people had confidence the government was being irresponsible with money. host: we are talking with congressman matthew cartwright, democrat from pennsylvania. he served as an attorney for 24 years. a law degree from the university of pennsylvania law school and representing the state of pennsylvania in the house as well. ent from kennm weeks. let me add to that. guest: ok. that is a boatload of questi
: this is from an interview back in 1998 when bill clinton was in the white house. chuck hagel said, "they are representing america. they are representing our lifestyle, our values, our standards. and i think it is an inhibiting factor to be gay -- openly aggressively gave like mr. hormel -- to do an effective job." he has since apologized for those remarks. guest: he is not in the domestic policy division as secretary of defense. i think domestic issues, whether it be guns or abortion or gay rights, -- it is not just that ", but the way. -- it is not just that quote by the way. all of which raises the question of why the president would want him. i think the senate committee in particular have to pay attention to -- given that record, why was the president backing susan rice? why is he so dead set on having senator hagel be secretary of defense? i think he is somebody the president really trust to re- trench the american power. there is going to be a fundamental choice made for the next four years. his nomination is just beginning of that debate. host: isn't figuring where you want to mov
winning for best song for the james bond film "skyfall." to bill clinton coming on stage to present a clip from the film "lincoln." it seemed like everyone in the audience was surprised. >> what an exciting special guest. that was hillary clinton's husband. >> reporter: did the folks at the "lincoln" table know? >> a couple of them. i didn't know when though. it still was amazing because, even knowing it it still was amazing. >> i'm just going to put it out there, right? loud and proud right? >> reporter: in the most emotional speech of the night, jodie foster alluded to her sexuality, saying she came out years ago to friends and family but made a plea for privacy. >> if you had been a public figure from the time that you were a toddler, if you had to fight for a life that felt real and honest and normal against all odds then maybe then you too might value privacy above all else. >> jodie foster's speech was mind blowingly beautiful. >> reporter: backstage the night's winners said they understood foster's desire for privacy. >> because our job is to transfor
. and despite her recents health scare, bill clinton says hillary is doing great. he made a bold prediction about theo outgoing secretary of stat. >> she's always been very, very healthy and she has very low blood pressure. i tell her that she's still got time to have three more husbands after me. so i think she'll live to be 120. >> hillary clinton as you know is recovering from a blood clot in her head. >>> in englewood, california, a woman -- a man, rather, has experienced his own version of reality tv. he was watching a high speed chase on television when all of a sudden the car with the cops in hot pursuit passed right in front of him. police eventually arrested the driver. said he was only a boy although they declined to re veal his age. >>> so believe it or not, this picture you'll see tells only half the story. coming up, the bizarre train wreck caused by a cleaning lady. >>> plus extreme eating. every time you go some of the most popular restaurants in the country, and we're not talking about drive-through. we're counting calories, you will be shocked next. abetes... your doctor wi
traditional progressive approach. as for your first question, absolutely, john. hillary clinton would, in fact, keep papering over this issue, although i do think there would at least be some kind of a bill bradley-style challenge. in 2000 al gore faced a challenge from bill bradley on his left. it wouldn't be as robust as bradley was in 2000, i don't think -- and that wasn't terribly robust in 2000, but i think there would be some nominal challenge from her left that would say, you know, democrats can't go back to sort of clinton-style politics. now, given her popularity, as you mentioned, john, across demographic and across ideological lines, i think it would be fairly minimal. there would be some kind of challenge there, i believe. >> gene, jonathan just mentioned sherrod brown's sense that, you know, they weren't going to go near entitlements because entitlements, that's who the democratic party is. that's who they are. entitlements are now 20% think of federal spending. how do the democrats, the republicans, how does this country survive economically without addressing entitlements? and b
to be lofty, inspirational and unifying, if anything? >> you know, i was reading bill clinton's second inaugural where he talks about, you know, the status quo nature of government which we see today as well, that americans a americans are to turn this division the government the way it is. the petty bickering they did for big things. i think the president wants to try to talk about where he feels he can have the most impact in his second term domestically and internationally which is a huge piece, by the way. because i think his first term internationally was about coming home, was about sort of pulling america back from its projection of power. there are so many both real problems and crises but also opportunities for the president. so i think that the speech is really about where he wants to have the most impact. and i think that's how he'll be judged, and that's where people will really take notice of what he says. >> david, before you tell us who's on "meet the press" this sunday, back to the speech for just a moment. do you think there's any chance at all that the president will
reagan from 1981. bill clinton from 1993. president eisenhower in 1957. harry truman in 1949. richard nixon from 1969. john kennedy in 1961. george bush at 10:00 eastern at 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. the jakarta from 1977. at 11:00, george w. bush and his 2001 inauguration. -- lyndon johnson -- jimmy carter in 1977. that is coming up at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night on c- span. our inauguration coverage kicks off this weekend as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony is sunday at the white house. we will have live coverage. we will also include your phone calls. we will begin with a look back at president obama's 2009 inaugural address. then on monday, the public inaugural ceremonies with the swearing in at noon, the capitol luncheon, and a parade down pennsylvania avenue. coverage begins at 7:00 eastern here on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. join the conversation throughout the day on facebook and twitter. >> the greatest honor history can be so is the title of peacemaker. this honor now beckons america the chance to help lead the world of
they found out he wasn't wearing that hat. >> bill clinton showed up, too. >> did he? >> yeah. >> he got the win. more importantly, duke lost to the wolf pack. they were undefeated and michigan lost to ohio state. so then you saw the falcons finally got off. >> and the patriots won? >> the patriots looked pretty good. >> it was a one-point gain, right? >> it was 30 seconds. anyway, we'll be back. i had to end with some sports after that hollywood dribble. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. dow looks like it would open up about 15 points higher. s&p 500 would open up almost 2 points higher. the nasdaq is off slightly, may
the optimism -- technology sector? what are the lessons that come from this? the other day bill clinton was saying we cannot really expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access to the speed of curia. he is right. rolee outline technology's and repositioning the u.s. as the world's innovation leader tonight on the communicators at 8:00 eastern on c-span2. >> now the new america foundation discussing the status of the guantanamo bay detention center. last week was the 11th anniversary of the opening. >> welcome to the new america foundation. it is the 11th anniversary of the opening of guantanamo. we have an exceptionally well- informed, to talk about that. we have pretty much the same group, exactly the same group speaking in this room one year ago. i asked and the worthington how many people have been released since the event one year ago and the answer is four there is still 166 detainees at guantanamo the question that this panel -- the big question is -- is the obama administration moving towards a policy of indefinite detention? first up to speak will be
the gentleman mr. smith. chris smith, bill pass pascrell, mr. -- and mr. king. mr. king, you still here. rest of you may have left to go vote, so jim,let get you up here . and mr. mcclinton, you're in this. we can have you join in there also. and bill, now begin with the gentleman mr. smith. mr. smith, you're recognize 8. >> thank you mr. chairman and member of the committee. i want to associate myself from the remarking about -- [inaudible] our delegation is very strongly bipartisan in a bipartisan fashion is supported the amendment. he talked about 346,000 homes have been destroyed. 11,000 uninhasn'tble. unbelievable. my district has been effected like so many others. i again would ask that the committee make that amendment in order when it votes. i do want to thank you you again for the opportunity to speak about amendment number 85, which would address a critical gap in overall assistance to energy of the vitally important legislation. the substantial portion of the assistance provided during the time of the emergency and this continues has been by faith-based community. in time of the d
will introduce early next week. in in this bill, we will nullify anything that the president does that smacks of legislation. several executive orders that appear as if he's writing law. that cannot happen. we struck down once -- the court struck down clinton for trying this, and i'm afraid president obama may have this king complex. >> what do you make of what he's saying? 23 executive actions, some you think would be targets for being struck down by a court? >>> there's the completely anti government wing that will make that argument. i guess they made it against president bush 41 when he banned the importation of certain kind of assault weapons and made it against executive order signed by president clinton. presidents have the power to do executive orders. that's a power deferred to the president by congress and the constitution. there are those -- as rand paul says, he wants to nullify. that's code word. >> for what? >> nullification, look when it's been used. it's kind of a state's rights argument that gets used in times of great controversy. but the president is acting by executive pow
's unclear if anything has been proposed forty. but a similar bill failed in 2011. a former army staff sergeant known for his epic valor in the afghan war is the fourth living recipient for actions in iraq or afghanistan. president obama will present the award to clinton ramesha next month, saying me and fellow soldiers were surrounded by dozens of enemy fighters and fought back bravely and he took out an enemy machine gun team, despite his injuries. coming up, ousted egyptian president hosni mubarak tries to get out of a life sentence for allowing protesters to be murdered. and feverish, coughing, achy flu is sweeping the country. it is not too late to get the flu shot. but is it still available? officemax has exactly the ink... your business needs... at prices that keep you...out of the red. this week get a bonus $15 itunes gift card with any qualifying $75 ink purchase. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball
to put that tent with clinton. if you were getting hurricanes' every five or six years he would get a bill to there. the storm system in the 30's of any magnitude it made perfect sense when you get it. we're not going to rebuild that the way. so from the science perspective here is my asked. who is making the decisions about where we build, how we build, and building codes. if you're not familiar with the devastates and will take this to the federal government, no. this is that decisions are made every day where risk exposure occurs. on the day-to-day transactional basis you probably don't really see this, but this is where decisions are made about where we will kick -- where we build, how we build, the types of building codes we're going to enforce, yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure generate revenue. how the local officials to their revenue is jobs and growth. have you ever seen anyone running for office seminar committee to give small? it's always jobs and growth. that is the mantra. yet they're having to make decisions that oftentimes are short-term, very limi
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